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Okenia rosacea, the Hopkins Rose nudibranch, from a study done in 2016 by Armstrong, Tanner, and Stillman. Photo: R. Tanner, Avila Beach, 2016.

Okenia rosacea, the Hopkins Rose nudibranch, from a study done in 2016 by Armstrong, Tanner, and Stillman.
Photo: R. Tanner, Avila Beach, 2016.

Hermissenda crassicornis, the Opalescent nudibranch, from a study done in 2016 by Armstrong, Tanner, and Stillman. Photo: R. Tanner, Avila Beach, 2016.

Hermissenda crassicornis, the Opalescent nudibranch, from a study done in 2016 by Armstrong, Tanner, and Stillman.
Photo: R. Tanner, Avila Beach, 2016.

Richelle Tanner

(co-advised with Dr. Jonathon Stillman)

I utilize the fields of community ecology, population genetics, biomechanics, and physiology to answer questions about climate change effects in Phyllaplysia taylori, an estuarine sea hare living in eelgrass beds. Specifically, I'm interested in how new populations of P. taylori colonize San Francisco Bay eelgrass restoration sites, as they play a large role in eelgrass ecosystem health as epiphyte grazers. My current work investigates maternal effects of temperature on larval development, latitudinal trends in thermal tolerance, and local adaptation. I also work with many types of Eastern Pacific nudibranchs and sea hares investigating similar questions.

Prior to coming to UC Berkeley, I finished my undergraduate degrees in environmental studies and jazz studies at the University of Southern California. My undergraduate research projects investigated secondary productivity in subtidal eelgrass beds on Catalina Island, CA and the effects of historic climate change on temperature trends and the urban heat island effect in cities along the western edge of the United States. In my spare time I can be found playing in small ensembles and jazz orchestras in the Bay Area, putting my undergraduate degree in jazz performance to good use! You can find out more about my research and other interests at www.richelletanner.com

Phyllaplysia taylori, the Zebra sea hare or Taylor's Sea Hare, in its eelgrass habitat grazing on epiphytic growth. Photo: R. Tanner, Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, 2016.

Phyllaplysia taylori, the Zebra sea hare or Taylor's Sea Hare, in its eelgrass habitat grazing on epiphytic growth.
Photo: R. Tanner, Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies, 2016.